A Digest of the Doctrine of St. Thomas: On the Incarnation

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A Digest of the Doctrine of St. Thomas: On the Incarnation

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Description: Every Christmas, it’s the same old story. Every television show doesn’t teach that Jesus is God, Christ’s incarnation doesn’t make sense, there is discontinuity between Christ’s divinity and humanity, and so on—it’s all so terribly unoriginal. These so called “free thinkers” seem to believe that they have duped Christian theologians or discovered the hidden chink in the intellectual armor of the Christian faith. While they fancy themselves to be courageous and intrepid in their criticisms, the reality is that they are cowards who attack a Christian faith which is fit for a first grader. The fact of the matter is that their arguments cannot stand up to a mature Christianity meant for full-grown men.

If the faithful are to stand up to these intellectual bullies then we need to put down the milk and dig into the meat of the Catholic doctrine on Christ. In this volume, you will find a full-course meal on the doctrine of Incarnation written by none other than St. Thomas Aquinas Himself as skillfully prepared and compiled by William Humphrey. From front to back, A Digest of the Doctrine of St. Thomas on the Incarnation will give you everything you need to understand the intricacies, necessity, and beauty of the Word made flesh. Open this up and partake in a feast which will nourish your mind and soul and help you learn to imitate the mature stature of Christ. By the end of the book, you’ll be more than equipped to refute the absurd non-sense spouted by the feeble attacks on Christ’s incarnation.

From the Preface: “The Nature of God is the essence of goodness, and it belongs to the idea of goodness that it seeks to communicate itself to others, and to the idea of the highest good that it can communicate itself in the highest possible manner—hence the incarnation. By it the invisible things of God from the creation of the world are seen, being understood by things that are made: His goodness in that he despised not the infirmity of the work of His hands; His justice in that the tyrant who had conquered man by man be conquered; His wisdom in devising, and His infinite power in accomplishing, the mystery—than which there is none greater—that God should be made man.” — St. Thomas Aquinas

Description

Description: Every Christmas, it’s the same old story. Every television show doesn’t teach that Jesus is God, Christ’s incarnation doesn’t make sense, there is discontinuity between Christ’s divinity and humanity, and so on—it’s all so terribly unoriginal. These so called “free thinkers” seem to believe that they have duped Christian theologians or discovered the hidden chink in the intellectual armor of the Christian faith. While they fancy themselves to be courageous and intrepid in their criticisms, the reality is that they are cowards who attack a Christian faith which is fit for a first grader. The fact of the matter is that their arguments cannot stand up to a mature Christianity meant for full-grown men.

If the faithful are to stand up to these intellectual bullies then we need to put down the milk and dig into the meat of the Catholic doctrine on Christ. In this volume, you will find a full-course meal on the doctrine of Incarnation written by none other than St. Thomas Aquinas Himself as skillfully prepared and compiled by William Humphrey. From front to back, A Digest of the Doctrine of St. Thomas on the Incarnation will give you everything you need to understand the intricacies, necessity, and beauty of the Word made flesh. Open this up and partake in a feast which will nourish your mind and soul and help you learn to imitate the mature stature of Christ. By the end of the book, you’ll be more than equipped to refute the absurd non-sense spouted by the feeble attacks on Christ’s incarnation.

From the Preface: “The Nature of God is the essence of goodness, and it belongs to the idea of goodness that it seeks to communicate itself to others, and to the idea of the highest good that it can communicate itself in the highest possible manner—hence the incarnation. By it the invisible things of God from the creation of the world are seen, being understood by things that are made: His goodness in that he despised not the infirmity of the work of His hands; His justice in that the tyrant who had conquered man by man be conquered; His wisdom in devising, and His infinite power in accomplishing, the mystery—than which there is none greater—that God should be made man.” — St. Thomas Aquinas

                                 

                                              What You Will Find Inside…

  • That Christ is true man
  • How Christ’s human intellect was limited without doing injury to His Divinity
  • Why it is necessary that Christ had a true human will
  • Ways people fall into error about Christ
  • The Council of Chalcedon, Ephesus, Nicaea, and other ecumenical councils and their role in the development of the doctrine of the Incarnation
  • How to understand terms such as Secundum Rem and Secundum Ratinonem Intellegendi why these distinctions clarify how we know Christ
  • That the hypostatic union is the answer to the childish question “If Jesus is God then who was he praying to in the garden?”
  • Subsistence and how Christ is one person in two natures
  • Christ’s REAL human soul and why it matters for our salvation
  • That there is NOTHING missing in Christ that is in man by nature
  • How Christ as God means that he is 100% God and not some sort of demi-god or other such nonsense
  • Divine immutability and the Incarnation: How the Word taking on human flesh DOES NOT bring about any changes in God
  • That the person of Christ was NOT created but exists from ALL ETERNITY as EQUAL and UNITED to the Father in nature.
  • Why man’s salvation is only possible through the Incarnation
  • How Christ is like a groom united to His bride or a commander heading an army
  • Christ’s suffering on the Cross: Spiritual and Physical
  • That Christ’s suffering does not effect change in the PERSON of Christ or His Divine Nature
  • What Christ did when he “Descended into Hell”
  • The nature of death and what it means to say “God Died” on the cross
  • The Standard by which Jesus issues judgment and how to find mercy through repentance
  • A deeper understanding of the mystery of Christ’s passion
  • How to understand the distinction between Christ’s humanity and His Divinity
  • Recognizing the ancient heresy of Gnosticism and how it is being repeated in our day
  • Manicheism and the fallacy of denying the importance of the fleshly incarnation of Christ
  • A refutation of the heresy of Nestorianism, something affirmed by many protestants
  • How affirming a Nestorian position implies a denial of Christ’s full Divinity
  • The Greatest Hersey: Arianism and its refutation
  • Exegesis on the church fathers on the Incarnation
  • That Jesus’ work was salvific to save us from death but to also heal us of every wound of sin
  • Israel and her mission to bring about the Redeemer
  • Christ’s presence in the Old Testament
  • Figural reading of the Gospels and their relationship to Old Covenant events and figures
  • Adam and Christ’s role as the “New Adam” which restores creation
  • The Incarnation as a rescue of all creation
  • Harrowing of hell
  • Eucharistic Sacrifice and its re-presentation of the work of the cross
  • Why the Resurrection was necessary for our salvation
  • The Graces won by Christ and how to access them
  • The fittingness of the sacraments as the ordinary means of Salvation
  • Our Lord’s passion as the source of all the Sacraments
  • The Thomistic Teaching on Limbo (no, not the dance)
  • Hell as the fitting wage for unrepentant sinners
  • Nature of our reward and the vision of God
  • Purgatory and why it is an extension of Christ’s mercy and justice which occurs after death

 

 

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